Archive

Digital Art/3D

I found this artist just the other day and I already forget how I came across her work but I love it. I think I had followed a concept artist on Twitter and Piper’s Twitter page came up on the related profiles to follow.

Piper is a freelance character designer/illustrator/artist that has worked for Nickelodeon, Dream Works and Intel.

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I love how fleshed out her style is already. It’s easy to forget how many different styles of art there are within just one medium. For example, Piper’s work is very different from Pascal’s work even though they both use similar drawing and painting tools in Photoshop to represent 3D objects in a 2D space.

If you’d like to support Piper you can do so on her Patreon Page and also give her a follow on social media: DeviantART Tumblr Twitter Instagram
-Alex

Fall of Gods

Back in February I found the work of Rasmus Berggreen, a great concept artist who has worked on games like Hitman: Absolution. In September of 2014 Rasmus and his company MOOD launched a Kickstarter campaign for a book called Fall of Gods. The book is almost a cross between a graphic novel and an illustrated children’s book. It is filled with pages and pages of epic digital paintings by Rasmus which tell a grand story based off of Norse mythological tales of old.

What drew me to this book Fall of Gods was not only the epic story but also the concept art style of illustration. Rasmus combines drawing, painting, and photographs in photoshop to create entirely new images with a high level of detail and realism. This sort of technique, called “Digital Matte Painting” or just “Matte Painting” before the digital age, is often used in the film industry to replace skies and extend landscapes. If you’re a fan of Peter Jackson’s movie The Hobbit or The Lord of the Rings Trilogy you’ve probably seen a lot of Matte Painting on screen without realizing it.

While there is no shortage of concept art on the web there is a smaller amount of concept art that is also combined with photographs and yet an even smaller amount of books that are illustrated in this fashion. I would even venture to say that Fall of Gods is one of a few, if not one of a kind, in terms of the book’s overall illustration style, layout, and storyline. It’s nice to see that concept art feel pushed to the forefront of a viewing medium like this book when so often the concept art itself does not make it through to the final presentation in a video game or feature film.

I’m very glad that Rasmus has a chance to shine in the spotlight a little bit with this book and also reveal a bit more of what a concept artist can really do. I think that professional titles get muddied during the credits of a game or movie and it’s sometimes hard to tell what one department really does that sets them apart from one another. This book really defines the concept artist department for me and makes things a little less murky. I feel like I could better describe what a concept artist does now that I’ve read this book which may be a good selling point for you if you’re thinking about picking up a copy.

And if that’s not enough, Eon Sounds, a “Music scoring, production and licensing company for TV, Films, Trailers and Games” contacted me on Twitter the other day and said that they had made an OST for Fall of Gods. This book has its own original soundtrack. That’s awesome!

 

To add even more awesomeness, 20th Century Fox is picking up Fall of Gods for a movie.

I think that is just the coolest thing that someone could:

  1. Come up with an idea for a book
  2. Write and Illustrate that book
  3. Gain support for their book on Kickstarter and get their book published
  4. Get an original soundtrack made for their book
  5. Have a major TV/Film production company want to make their book into a movie.

I’m so psyched for the movie and also the sequel to this book if and when there is one. I’ll keep you posted if I hear anything else.

 

-Alex

I recently stumbled upon Scott Robertson’s work. Scott is the Former Chair of Entertainment Design at the Art Center College of Design- Designer / Author / Educator / Co-Producer. What sparked my interest in particular was this lecture he gave on creating sources of inspiration. I want to share this lecture with you because I really enjoyed seeing his creative process.

Scott’s work is somewhat similar to what I’m starting to work on now. I haven’t spoken much about what I’m doing at the moment here on the blog but I’m definitely branching out from using just photography to create the images I want.

Scott combines his drawings with 3D models and other photographs and his lecture gave me a glimpse of the type of work you can do when you combine multiple mediums together. I’m not usually a big lecture fan but I bookmarked this one immediately after watching. Anyway, I’ll leave you with the video.

Since I joined Pinterest I’ve been exposed to such a wide variety of art that I did not know existed. Thousands upon thousands of artists go unnoticed and unappreciated on the internet but one great illustrator has recently bubbled to the surface of it all. Pascal Campion is the artist behind the Sketch of the Day project which has become quite popular and very unique.

The video (see above) details a bit of Pascal’s artistic process in which he develops sketches based on the emotions behind everyday scenes. He then continues to develop his sketch in Photoshop using a Wacom tablet to paint colors into the sketch and use adjustment layers to bring his concept to a fine glistening polish.

Unlike photographers, illustrators have a very distinct style to their work similar to the way one person’s handwriting differs from another. I find it interesting to watch as Pascal starts with a rough sketch on paper and evolves his work into something completely refined through digital manipulation and colorization in Photoshop. His work is an extraordinary representation of what can be accomplished through the use of multiple mediums. Pascal takes complete control of his art and only leaves the sky as the limit, a true artist, unrestricted and growing every day.

You can find Pascal on his website: http://www.pascalcampion.com

-Alex

For about as long as I have been using Photoshop, I have followed the work of digital artist, Michael Vincent Manalo. Phlearn has published quite possibly the most complete and extensive interview of Manalo on their website.

Take a few minutes and peruse his work. Most of his images have a very dark, eery and surreal feeling to them. I am always fascinated by all the incongruous things he is able to fit into the same image.

-Alex